Kickstarter is the new “beta” customer, “social proof” and “friends and family” round all rolled into 1 for #entrepreneurs

I had a chance to meet an amazing entrepreneur on Tuesday at Utah, Tammy Bowers, who the founder of LionHeart Innovations. They provide a mobile platform to help caregivers of kids with chronic conditions. Think of it like a coordinated platform that everyone who cares for the kids needs to ensure they are all in sync – the mom, the dad, nurse, doctor, nanny, etc.

Their son has a health condition so their startup was born from that experience. Now, after many months of working with health organizations and other care givers, they are ready to launch their mobile app.

A decade ago, options for Tammy would have been to talk to a lot of potential customers, then raise a small “friends and family” round and then look to get some marquee investors / advisors agree to be associated with the company – to provide social proof.

Now there’s indegogo and kickstarter. Tammy put together an early funding campaign on the tool to see there were many other parents who were also interested in the tool to keep their folks in the know. Word of mouth, thanks to the indegogo campaign also got her a lot of press among bloggers, media and news outlets.

For entrepreneurs in smaller cities, getting the attention of Silicon Valley angels or investors is very difficult if not impossible. Many local investors are willing to help, but they lack the ability to validate the problem, the need and hence tend to invest in “things they know very well” or “those things that generate revenues quickly.

Enter crowd funding. If you thought it was for hardware programs alone or for creative ideas, then you need to look at indegogo and other platforms again. 7 of the 10 companies in the accelerator program at Seattle raised money on these platforms. Some of them raised $50K and others more than $350K.

There are 3 things a successful crowdfunding campaign gives you:

1. Customer validation: People (real customers, though largely early adopters) put their money where the mouth is. Not just “likes on facebook”, they commit dollars to your program.

2. Funding: If you can put a little money into your campaign, typically the crowdfunding dollars can help you generate more money to ship your product.

3. Social proof: I would highly recommend you talk to a few “influencers” who can back your campaign on these platforms, but if they dont and still notice it, then the campaign can help you generate some press, which is good social proof if you can get folks to share the press.

I am a huge fan of these programs not just for creative movies, music and hardware “maker” type products, but also for software products that are niche initially.

There are 3 important elements of a successful crowdfunding campaign, which other folks can tell you more about:

1. Create great content assets – video is usually essential.

2. Engage with potential influencers before your campaign so they can back you when the campaign launches.

3. Provide quick and constant updates to your backer so they can help champion and be evangelists for your startup.

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