A framework for how to take advice – for #entrepreneurs

There is no shortage of advice or number of advisers and the time you are given advice as an entrepreneur.

It can be overwhelming for an entrepreneur, especially when they hear from conflicting advice from trusted sources.

The 3 most important factors that should go into the decision making process for taking advice is a) Who should you take advice from b) What advice should you take and c) When should you seek that advice.

There are 2 kinds of people you take advice from – those you consider as “experts” in the field and those who have “experience” with the specific problem you set are seeking the advice from. Everyone else is rather a big waste of time. So, if you are an entrepreneur and seek advice from someone at a much larger company on what you should do with your product direction, when they are not an expert in the field, then be prepared to be given useless advice. Well, you asked for it so there.

Expertise is easy to ascertain since, it has a factual basis. If someone is a certified legal professional, then they know the aspect of law they practice. They won’t necessarily be the best at litigation or immigration if they are a corporate attorney, but they would be the best at company legalese.

Experience is best couched with situational awareness. If the person giving the advice is smart, they will tell you the specific conditions, background and environment that the course of action worked. From that, you can at least determine if it might work for you in your specific situation.

The worst people to take advice from are those that pattern match. In my experience, most investors, general practitioners and enthusiasts understand a situation by talking to many people and offering their generic opinion couched as “experience”.

If you seek advice from those whose experiences don’t match your current situation, then you will get suboptimal advice. People who are confident may tell you they don’t know, but it is more likely you will get opinions from 3rd party reading couched as experience.

You need actually both expertise and experiential advice for most situations, which is why understanding the contours of the problem will help you explain it to the person you are seeking advice from.

What you need advice on falls into 2 buckets as well. Easy questions and hard questions. Easy questions have a binary outcome. These are fairly rare. Most difficult questions tend to have a range of answers, with complicated if-then-else statements around the answer.

Easy questions are those that can be answered by experts alone. Can you hire someone from your ex-employer is fairly easy to answer if you look at your exit interview or contract and have a legal person review it.

Hard questions typically will give you multiple choices, not just two. Should I raise money is an easy question to answer if you are running out of cash, but the harder question of who to raise money from and how much to raise are harder questions that can run the gamut based on your situation.

Finally, when you seek advice is also fairly binary. You can either seek advice when you need it, or way before you encounter your specific situation. Seeking it after is just a waste of time – it reaffirms your position and makes your feel nice, or it will make you regret the decision since the advice you get is contrary to the decision you already took.

If you seek advice just when you need it, prepare to be rushed and expect to miss out on key details that tend to be nuances and shades of grey. For example, trying to decide what type of company (C corp or S corp) you should incorporate is best done when you don’t need it done yesterday. It will give you time to think about the options if you learn about the options way before you need them and keep the notes handy.

Seeking advice way before you need it is useful in situations when the impact is longer term. When the decision to be made cannot be reversed very easily (for example who you want as a cofounder), you are better off getting advice on the type of cofounder you need.

The biggest challenge is always the conflicting nature of the advice. What do you do when two people, both of who you trust, offer very different advice or in fact the exact opposite advice.

The relative scale of their expertise and experience does not count, so most people go with what they feel “more comfortable” with. Or they get more opinions and do a “vote count”. Either way it tends to be sub-optimal only in hindsight.

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