Time spent on pricing page is the #1 early indicator of your SaaS freemium conversion rate

When I looked at 89 companies to learn how to convert freemium customers to paid, I also reached out to 13 of them to understand what drives the conversion.

Any early indicator to better conversion from viewing the pricing page to signing up for a plan was time spent on the pricing page.

If customers spent very little time (less than any other page) on your pricing page, then they would either not sign up or sign up for the “free plan”.

If customers spent too much time (more than any other page) then they would not sign up at all.

If customers spent time in the “middle zone” of your other pages, they conversion rate to a paid plan was most likely.

This was even if you had a free option prominently featured on your pricing page.

So how do you figure that out. I am assuming most people start out using Google analytics.

Google analytics: Time spent on pages
Google analytics: Time spent on pages

On your Google analytics page you can navigate to All pages and look at the average time spent on page. (see below).

Navigating to Time spent on page in Google Analytics
Navigating to Time spent on page in Google Analytics

So why is this the case? There are 3 major reasons I learned:

1. More time spent usually meant more options and more confusion for customers. When customers were given 3 pricing options (one of them being free) the conversions were higher, than when there were 5 pricing options. Not surprisingly even when the “free plan” was displayed “under the fold”, the conversions were the same. See below for what “Below the Fold” means.

Free plan as an option
Free plan as an option
Free plan below the fold as an option
Free plan below the fold as an option

2. More time spent on the page also indicated customers were reviewing other competitive options on other tabs. While less time meant customers had already made up their mind, so they were more likely to just “sign up and try”, it also meant the customer liked the options enough to try.

3. If the pricing option was the place where customers spent the least amount of time, than other pages, that was an indication that the customers were not ready to sign up and were “window shopping” alone. Either they did not have the pain point that your product addressed, or they were not in as much pain to even try the solution.

There were 2 exceptions that I found consistently among all the marketers I spoke with.

Not surprisingly, if the “referral source” of the customer was a search marketing campaign, and the time spent was the least, then the conversion rates were much higher than the referral sources.

If the referral source, was social and the time spent was more than other pages, then the conversion rates were much higher as well.

You can find referral source on Google analytics and correlate that to the time spent on pages.

Referral Source Google Analytics
Referral Source Google Analytics
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